Detroit Eats

Musings of A Detroit Based Food Fanatic

Zhang BBQ

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   While I was investigating Tai Pan bakery (31664 John R, Madison Height) I noticed that just a couple of stores away there was a Chinese BBQ Shop. I wandered in to investigate and tried to ask some questions of a gentleman sitting behind the counter. I was disappointed that he chose not to speak with me considering that I just wanted to write about his shop. Perhaps he thought I was the health inspector or something. In any case he did have the interesting fare. In addition to roast pork( very good) he had several roast ducks and chickens hanging up. As in many other culture nothing is left to waste and this place was no exceptions. Behind the glass showcase there were duck feet and wings, fried pork intestine, spare ribs and even BBQ squid. All items were available by the pound and several “lunch box’ combinations were available. Zhang BBQ is open 10 AM – 8 PM Monday through Friday and 9 AM – 3 PM Saturday and Sunday but bring cash as charges are not accepted.

Zhang BBQ
31692 John R
Madison Heights

Written by Ed Schenk

December 17, 2010 at 12:23 am

Posted in Review

Tagged with , ,

Happy Fourth of July!!Cedar Planked Salmon,Grilled Corn and Dilled Redskin Potato Salad

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     Thanks for Checking in! I am still working in Grand Rapids and, as I love to do, explored the local food scene. I found a Vietnamese bakery that serves up a respectable Bahn Mi Sandwich and something call a snowball ( Chicken Vegetable and egg steamed inside a bread dough). Most recently there was an Indian grocery nearby that had Potato and Pea Samosas that were outstanding. The balance between the potato, curry and lime  was beyond description. I know they were not made there but someone is making  an excellent product. I had 4.

     On July 4, 2010 I returned to my home in Eastpointe for a few days of Rest & Revival. Due to my late arrival my wife and I had an impromptu feast featuring some Ribeye steak, Hebrew National Hot Dogs,Grilled Romaine ( with Maytag Blue) and sautéed grape tomato with fresh basil and Olive oil. The evening finished with a very pleasant fireworks display supplied by several of our neighbors.fireworks a

      “Today is the actual Grilling Day/Holiday for me. As much as I enjoy my steak and salad the call was put out for salmon! Up to the challenge I came up with a menu. Salmon(Cedar planked) , Dilled Redskin Potato Salad and Grilled Corn.

         Cedar (or planked) Salmon is a method acquired from the native Americans who attached there fish to a wood plank before placing them near the fire to cook.  For the Salmon I was fortunate in having Cedar planks in house. They were a foodie gift and I look forward to every opportunity to use them. I have some Maple syrup and will rub my salmon down with it before placing it on the grill. salmon cedar 2

     For the grilled corn I know there are several schools of thought. One involves soaking the husk (and corn) and putting it on the grill. To me, this only steams it! Grilled corn, to me, is fresh corn rubbed with butter and spice and thrown directly on the grill until slightly charred. I like chili powder and cumin.grilled corn

    To finish the menu I like Dilled Potato Salad. The potatoes are Michigan new potatoes. The dill grows wild around my house ( I love to forage!). I also have oregano, basil, rosemary and mint that grow wild around my house.fresh dill

Written by Ed Schenk

July 7, 2010 at 9:30 pm

No… I haven’t gotten lost!!!/ Rib eye Steak with Grilled Romaine

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      In my last post I alluded to my new position.I wanted bring you up to date with my current status. I am currently in Grand Rapids Michigan. I am living on-site and ( doing what I do) creating/implementing first rate dining services programs. I do return to my house in Detroit weekly.

        For the last 2 weeks I have enjoyed the  Downtown Blues Festival in Grand Rapids Little Ed was the first week and Duke Robilard  appeared last week. This week it was Janiva Magness.

janiva magness

     Last week we had our first Al Fresco Dining  event and it went very well. We had literally twice our usual number participants joined us.We will be doing this weekly as long as the weather allows. Our resident  love what we are doing!! We have a wonderful Chef Manager who has a great relationship with our residents.

      I am taking a day off but wanted to stay in  touch

     Michigan has great small cities. Lansing, Ann Arbor, Flint and Grand Rapids  each host an  variety of cultural  events.

 

gr

My favorite meals lately has been steak with grilled romaine lettuce. I top the lettuce with an herb vinaigrette ( herbs from my garden) and Maytag Blue Cheese, as well as marinating the steak in fresh  herbs from my garden. I am fortunate to have a butcher shop in my neighborhood and they will cut steaks to my specifications.  I prefer to have my steaks cut to about 2 # and grill/roast when cooking.

 

P1010110

 

The Romaine lettuce I drizzle with the vinaigrette after I have topped it with the cheese  and slice the steak thin.

steak on the grill steak1 steak on the grill 2

  The results are spectacular!!!

Written by Ed Schenk

June 26, 2010 at 8:48 am

Techniques 101 –Breaking Down a Chicken to 8 Pieces

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    ( In tribute to Jack Ubaldi)

    Many years ago I attended the New York Restaurant School. This was my first experience with formal culinary education. It was a tremendous experience that set my course in life.

     Amongst the instructors was a gentleman who taught butchering named Jack Ubaldi. He was a great man! If you click on the link you can learn more about this well known butcher, restaurateur, author and teacher. Under his tutelage I learned how to break down a side of beef,pork, lamb. How to break poultry down and, something no chef I have come across knows how to do, remove the bones from a chicken while leaving the skin and carcass intact ( I will cover this in another post!). These are skills I use to this day!

   One of Jack Ubaldi’s best known traits was to bring a bottle of wine with him to class. I remember fondly Jack giving me the keys to his locker and being sent for the wine because it was not enough to learn how to butcher, we had to learn how to cook what we cut!. We would cook a Newport Steak or Denver Ribs or whatever we worked with as part of our class.

     Butchering is a lost art. As much as the American Culinary Federation  does to keep standards high for skills required to be a Certified Chef, there are a large number of practicing culinarians who call themselves Chef who have no concept of how to break down a side of beef into quarters and then usable cuts or could explain the confirmation of various animals. This is due in large part to the prevalence of portion cut beef and chicken that has eliminated the opportunity for Chef’s to use this skill.

     One of the easiest tasks of butchering involves breaking down Chicken into individual pieces. The process starts by removing the wings from the carcass.

chicken 1

chicken 2

The second is to remove the leg and thigh and then separating the leg from the thigh.

chicken 3 chicken 6 chicken 7

The most important thing to remember is to use the path of least resistance ( Note the center picture where there is a separation of the darker meat –leg, and the lighter flesh – thigh). This is where you want to make your cut. Your cuts should be through the cartilage instead of the bone.

chicken 8 chicken 9   chicken 10

Lastly the breast should be separated from the back and either left bone in or ( in a further step) made boneless.It can the be split into 2 pieces through the central breast plate (which in a young chicken is cartilage).

chicken 11

Bon Apetit

Written by Ed Schenk

May 22, 2010 at 2:17 pm

Sorry I didn’t Write!

with 10 comments


image

     I want to begin by thanking all the folks who have been reading this blog.

      I have been posting 2 to 3 times a week for several months now but recently I took a position as Regional Director of Dining Services and it  has curtailed some of my efforts. As I am new to the company I choose not to reveal it’s name. My role/goal is to establish a first rate Dining Services program at each of the Senior Dining Communities I am involved in. This has taken up a great deal of my time.

     Recently we did a Mother’s Day Brunch and it was exceptional. There was Prime Rib, Chicken Marsala, fresh Asparagus with Hollandaise,Baby Carrots with Fresh Dill, as well as, an omelet bar, a cheesecake bar, a waffle bar and fresh fruit and pastries. I was thrilled that we put on an event on par with any in the area (and exceeding most).

 

Waffle Bar image   

      

I will be getting back to a regular posting as son as I am able. I hope you stay tuned in!

Written by Ed Schenk

May 14, 2010 at 1:08 pm

Just Messing Around in the Kitchen #4 – Korean Bulgogi

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    Bulgogi

     One of the most important things a kitchen when your “just messing Around in the kitchen” can have is a well stocked pantry. After all,having to shop for 20 different items before you even get started takes all the fun out of the effort, not to mention that it can also take a chunk out of you wallet. I try to be prepared to go in several directions when I’m in the kitchen. For Italian I always have staples like olive oil (extra virgin), Balsamic vinegar,Parmesan Cheese and pesto (home made). If I am feeling spicy and want to go south of the border I have Chili powder,olives,rice,beans and mole sauce,well, you get the idea!

     I was making dinner and thinking of my daughter. She is still in Seoul, South Korea teaching English. Anyway, I had an English chuck roast and I thought about giving it a Korean twist. In the pantry I already had Sesame oil/seeds,garlic,green onion and sake and this was pretty much all I needed to make the marinade for the beef. I had all the makings for Bulgogi.

   Traditionally this dish is made with short rib that is specially cut for this purpose (very good). In the past I have also used beef tenderloin (fabulous) but that’s not what I had. The trick to using the Chuck roast lay in slicing the beef very thinly across the grain. For this I had the perfect tool. I used my brand new food slicer. Once I had slice the beef it was time to marinate it.

Bulgogi Marinade

4 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons Brown Sugar
2 tablespoons Maple syrup
1tablespoon pear or pineapple juice
2 tablespoons Sake
2 tablespoons Sesame oil
3 tablespoons Chopped green onion
2 tablespoons chopped garlic
1 teaspoon fresh cracked black pepper
1 teaspoon ground sesame seed

 

Mix all ingredients, making sure to dissolve the brown sugar. Marinate the beef for at least 2 hours and not more that 4.

When my beef was ready to be cooked I got the BBQ going and made sure to oil the grates properly so the beef wouldn’t stick. I then grilled the beef very quickly. You don’t want to overcook this as the beef is very thin to start with.

Notes:

  • In a traditional Korean meal this would be served with what is called Banchan. Banchan is the traditional assortment of small dished that accompany every Korean meal. Most are pickled and some are very spicy. Banchan always includes Kimchi. Rice is also included at every meal.
  • Instead of Banchan I made a stir –fry of Spinach and bean sprouts that I seasoned with Sesame oil. It’s a very good combination.
  • While I try to not endorse any particular brands I will recommend Kadoya brand Sesame oil for your pantry. It is available in most Asian groceries. The right Sesame oil makes a big difference in cooking.
  • Since Maple syrup isn’t produced in Korea it really isn’t part of the marinade recipe. Usually honey is used but I didn’t have any so I used the maple syrup in my fridge.

“Namwi ddeoni deo keo boinda”

“A good start is important to any effort”

Written by Ed Schenk

April 26, 2010 at 9:08 pm

Technique #1 – Standard Breading Procedure

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    One of the most useful techniques used in the kitchen is Standard Breading Procedure. It is called this because the same techniques are used in a large variety of recipes including Chicken Parmesan, breaded fish, Mozzarella sticks and fried green tomatoes. Standard breading Procedure consist of three components, flour(seasoned), egg and milk mixture and breadcrumb. The idea is that the flour will stick to the Food being breaded. The food is then dipped in the egg and milk mixture and sticks to the flour. Finally, the food is the dredged in the breadcrumbs. One of the fine points if this procedure is the use of both hands in the process. For me this means that my left hand (my “wet” hand) moves the food into the flour to be coated, then into the egg mix and then into the breadcrumb mixture. This is where my right hand (dry hand) will coat the food with the breadcrumbs thoroughly. The reason this is important is that if the right hand (dry hand) becomes wet the breadcrumbs will stick to your hand and your food will not be coated properly. By the same token if your left hand gets coated with flour the egg will not stick (if this happens just wash and dry your hands and continue). Also if you are not comfortable working from left to right just switch your station around and work right to left     

standard breading procedure                     from Left to right        Flour               Egg mix       breadcrumb

     Within this framework there are a number of things that can be done to spice up the process. I have added cheese and herbs to the breadcrumbs or used crushed tortilla chip instead of breadcrumbs. I have also used instant potato flakes instead of breadcrumbs for fish. There are also Panko (Japanese) breadcrumbs that are available in almost every supermarket these days. Once breaded the food should be allowed to sit for about 10 minutes to allow a “glue to form that bond the flour,egg mix and breadcrumb together before cooking. At this point your food can also be individually frozen. This allows you to prep ahead of your meal. At the appropriate time just remove from the freezer and cook.

     One of the points that are important in cooking foods that are breaded is to make sure not to overbrown your coating. For me this means either sealing my breading in a pan with some oil or “flash frying” in my deep fryer ( there are many fine home models on the market these days) until I get the desired light brown color. I actually take my foods out a little lighter than I want them do to the fact that they will keep browning after being seared. Also, it is important to not overfill your fryer or your oil temperature will drop and your coating will not set. Because many of the items I prepare this way are somewhat larger(chicken or fish) than a slice of zucchini or tomato I prefer to finish these foods on a sheet pan in the oven. This way I get a great color without burning the breading before the food is actually cooked. I “flash fry” these items one or 2 at a time. They will still finish well in the over even if they have been pre fried.

     I hope you have enjoyed this post and will try some of techniques discussed. If anyone has questions I can be contacted at Detroit Eats

     Until Next time..

Written by Ed Schenk

April 19, 2010 at 7:49 pm

Posted in Food, Recipe

Tagged with , , , , ,

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